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YOUR FAVORITE WINE OF THE MONTH CLUB INCLUDES FREE SHIPPING  PLUS YOUR 3RD BONUS BOTTLE IS ENCLOSED! WE SHIP 3 BOTTLES EVERY MONTH (2 FEATURES + 1 BONUS BOTTLE) CHEERS!

The wine industry, and your favorite Wine of the Month Club in particular, owes French scientist Louis Pasteur a standing ovation. One hundred and fifty-eight years ago, in the summer of 1857, his research (we assume fueled by his love of wine) shed new light on the principles, and thus the processes, of wine making. Until he began his research, wine making was basically a medieval chemical mystery, the success of which was more chance and magic than scientific in nature. Early on, the alcohol that developed during the process was thought to be the result of “unstabilizing vibrations” in sugar.

Louis’ experiments did more than vibrate the wine world – they literally rocked it! The martyred microbiologist proved that living yeast cells — not vibrations — were responsible for chemically changing sugar to alcohol in wine. This key knowledge allowed wine makers to first create and then repeat recipes. A bottle of muscat wine bottled in 1900, when produced today using grapes of equal quality, under the same conditions, and using the same recipe, will be very similar in color, smell, taste, body and finish. No vibrations . . . no magic . . . no luck. Just quality wine making blessed by Louis Pasteur, who said, “Wine is the most healthful and hygienic of all beverages.

FRANKLIN’S FOLLY . . . Benjamin Franklin, statesman, scientist and scholar, put his own spin on how we came to be blessed with wine decades before Pasteur’s discovery. “We hear of the conversion of water into wine at the marriage of Cana, as a miracle. But this conversion is, through the goodness of God, made every day before our eyes. Behold the rain which descends from Heaven upon our vineyards, and which incorporates itself with the grapes to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy.”  That part’s true.

WRIGHT’S WRONG . . .  Steven Wright said, “I’m making wine at home, but making it out of raisins so it’ll be aged automatically.” No wonder nobody ever heard of Steven Wright!

BAROQUE  PRIMITIVO  (Vintage 2013, Red) –  Country: Italy  Region: Salento  Grape: Primitivo

Salento is a peninsular region belonging to the southeastern part of the region of Puglia. It is a strip of land that forms the heel of the Italian boot, and is located between the Ionic Sea in the west and the Adriatic in the east. Initially inhabited by the famous horse breeders the Messaps, the people, land and culture have been influenced by the many people who conquered the region. It isknown both for its great wines and nature, where there are 1390 different species of flowering plants, architectural beauties, warm sun, blue sky, crystal seas and a dreamlike coast. But, oh, the wine!!

With a warm, windy climate, the flavor and humidity of the seas are carried across the flat land that’s rich in iron minerals and soft calcareous rocky subsoil. Most vineyards are grown as bush vines, without irrigation. The average vine age is 40 years, although there are some that are 70 years old.

The grapes used in this selection from your favorite Wine of the Month Club are 100% Primitivo from 40-year-old vines that depend on Mother Nature for irrigation. Scarlet red in your glass, you’ll find this wine to be intense, with the persistent aroma of plum jam. On the palate it is full-bodied, harmonious, with rich earthy tones and lingering finish. It is ready to be enjoyed now. Serve in a large glass at room temperature with pasta and meat sauce, eggplant Parmigiana, or beef braised in Primitivo.

Baroque Primitivo:  PRIMITIVO GRAPES — This grape is perhaps better known by its other name, Zinfandel. It is a variety of black skinned fruit that flourishes in the heel of Italy’s boot, where it was introduced in the 18th century. DNA links it to the Croatian grapes Crljenak Kastelanski and Tribidrag, where it’s thought it first grew. Naturally sweet, Primitivo wines are known for their robust nature, alcohol and tannic properties, and brilliant scarlet hues. When Primitivo found its way to the U.S. in the late 18th century, it assumed the name Zinfandel.

GREENHOUGH — SAUVIGNON BLANC (Vintage 2014, White) –  Country: New Zealand  Region: Nelson, on the South Island  Grape: Sauvignon Blanc

Nelson is the country’s eighth largest wine region and is an area of artists, artisans and stylish wines. It is sited on the western side of the country near the northern tip of New Zealand’s South Island. Mountains to the west provide a rain shadow effect, while the coastline helps to moderate temperature extremes. The vineyard is planted in free-draining, clay-rich soils beneath the foothills of the Richmond Ranges. Greenhough is a family-owned enterprise, established in 1991 by winemaker Andrew Greenhough and Jenny Wheeler. Originally a small vineyard and winery, it is now an 11 hectare plot with the original plantings largely redeveloped and the winery modernized. A small block of valuable Riesling, Pinot Noir and Pinot Blanc vines, now over 30 years old, remains.

It is the pleasure of your favorite Wine of the Month Club to share this 100% Sauvignon Blanc wine with you. The fruit came from the vineyards of Greenhough’s Hope “Larches Block” and the Morison Vineyards, both Certified Organic, and both from the high quality vintage of 2014. It is yellow with green tints, and is an elegant and balanced juicy wine that’s vibrant with aromas of white peach, mango, lime zest and dill. The palate is focused and lively. The small portion of wild yeast fermentation in the barrel enhances the palate texture. Enjoy it now, chilled, as an aperitif, with shellfish, white meats and soft, creamy cheeses.  Greenhough Sauvignon Blanc:

SAUVIGNON BLANC GRAPES — A white with very distinctive dusty character, high in acidity with up-front aromas and flavors. A climate-driven chameleon, Sauvignon Blanc wines may be fruity in character (ripe melon, fig, passion fruit), or vegetative and grassy. Mostly unoaked, the resulting wines are light to medium bodied and usually dry. They produce wines of different personalities, depending where they are grown.

GREENHOUGH — PINOT NOIR (Vintage 2012, Red) – Country: New Zealand  Region: Nelson, on the South Island  Grape: Pinot Noir

Nelson is the country’s eighth largest wine region and is an area of artists, artisans and stylish wines. It is sited on the western side of the country near the northern tip of New Zealand’s South Island. Mountains to the west provide a rain shadow effect, while the coastline helps to moderate temperature extremes. The vineyard is planted in free-draining, clay-rich soils beneath the foothills of the Richmond Ranges. Greenhough is a family-owned enterprise, established in 1991 by winemaker Andrew Greenhough and Jenny Wheeler. Originally a small vineyard and winery, it is now an 11 hectare plot with the original plantings largely redeveloped and the winery modernized. A small block of valuable Riesling, Pinot Noir and Pinot Blanc vines, now over 30 years old, remains.

It is the pleasure of your favorite Wine of the Month Club to share this 100% Pinot wine with you. It is a blend of fruit grown on 3 different sites, from the wet growing season of 2012. After blending, it was egg white fined, a rather unusual touch. It was then minimally filtered before the bright garnet red wine was bottled. It can be described as generous and appealing with wild berry aromas, subtle oak and layers of spice and herbs. The palate has a heart of light red fruit. A savory style with moderate tannins, it is ready to be enjoyed now. Serve 55°-65°F with cold cuts, burgers, sausages, grilled chicken, veal chops or cheese.

Greenhough Pinot Noir:  PINOT NOIR — One of the classics of the Champagne region of France, but its claim to greatest fame lies immediately south in Burgundy. In the right place, under ideal climatic conditions, it produces the most velvet-like smooth wines of any grape. Finicky and difficult to grow, Australia and New Zealand offer a climate and location similar to ideal. A loner, it is rarely blended. It assumes many personalities, depending on where and how it is grown, under what conditions, and how it is manipulated. Usually rather low in tannins with relatively high alcohol content.

COLLI ARGEN — PINOT GRIGIO  (Vintage 2014, White) – Country: Italy  Region: Veneto  Grape: Pinot Grigio

The Veneto is a region located in the northeast of the Italian Peninsula, and is one of Italy’sleading wine producers. The Romans founded the cities of Verona, Vicenza and Padova, andnamed what was then the 10th Imperial Region Venetia. Veneto and Venice are Latin for the area.

Colli Vicentini, the winery that produces this wine for your favorite Wine of the Month Club was founded in 1955. It is located next to the castles of Romeo and Juliet, and near the magnificent Palladian villas at the foot of the Colli Berici in Vicenza Province. Originally established with 33 enthusiastic vinegrowers, today it boasts 1,500 members and more than 5,000 acres of vineyards covering the four most important DOC zones of the region. The Colli Berici (Berici Hills) is a rural area of extraordinary natural beauty. Under sea at one time, the hills are of mostly volcanic rock, marine sediment, basalt and limestone. Vine-growing in this area dates back to the beginning of man’s settlement of the area.

This 100% Pinot Grigio is planted in the pergola (trellised) system, handpicked at the optimum time. With a color of straw yellow, it’s enhanced with golden reflexes in the glass. Rich bouquet with ample floral and fruity notes, on the palate it has a full, rich and well-balanced fruity taste and a pleasant finish. Enjoy it now, chilled, with light appetizers, soups, eggs, fish or risotto.

Colli Argen Pinot Grigio:  PINOT GRIGIO GRAPES — Also identified as Pinot Gris and Rulander, this white grape with a hint of lavender is capable of producing superior rich, complex wines. Its spiciness is seldom encountered in other varieties. This grape is responsible for many grand flavored, sweet fortified wines produced throughout the world with hues from white to yellow to slightly pink in color. The skin of this grape is more hued than most other whites, but be assured the grape is a true white. It originated in France as a mutation of Pinot Noir.

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Tracie Burket
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