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Clubs of America | Aug 02, 2016

PLUOTS — Part plum and part apricot, Pluots have a truly mixed heritage! These fruits were originally “invented” in the late 20th century by Floyd Zaiger, and today thrive in Washington …

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Clubs of America | Jul 05, 2016

BLACK PLUMS — Black Plums belong to the Prunus genus of plants, and are relatives of the peach, nectarine and almond.

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Clubs of America | May 06, 2016

The Pixie Tangerine is actually a variety of Mandarins. Somewhat difficult to grow, the trees take several years to reach maturity, producing an abundant crop every other year.

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Clubs of America | Apr 19, 2016

PINK LADY® APPLES — The Pink Lady® is an exciting apple originated in Western Australia. It is a natural cross between the Golden Delicious and Lady Williams varieties.

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Clubs of America | Mar 24, 2016

The MURCOTT TANGERINE is a citrus fruit hybrid of the mandarin orange and the sweet orange. This hybrid was a result of a citrus breeding program within the United States Department of Agriculture.

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Clubs of America | Feb 15, 2016

RED COMICE PEARS — Comice are among the sweetest and juiciest of all pears, and are a favorite in holiday gift boxes and baskets.

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Clubs of America | Dec 30, 2015

Satsuma Mandarins are most often eaten out of hand because they are so easy to peel, thanks to their very loose skin. Their bite-sized, sweet, juicy segments are nearly seedless.

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Clubs of America | Nov 19, 2015

BUERRÉ BOSC PEARS — It’s uncertain whether Bosc pears are Belgium or French in origin. What is known is that Bosc Pears were discovered sometime in the early 1800’s.

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Clubs of America | Oct 21, 2015

SUN GOLD ASIAN PEARS — Sometimes called “apple pears” because of their round shape and crunchy apple-like texture, Asian pears are more closely related to pears.

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Clubs of America | Oct 06, 2015

The Red Sensation, known also as “Max Red,” was first discovered as a bud sport on a standard Yellow Bartlett tree near Zillah, Washington in 1938.

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